THE LIFE OF A BAYESIAN BOY

 
Tom Leonard
 
Retired Professor of Statistics, Universities of Wisconsin and Edinburgh
 
Edinburgh, Scotland, May 2012
 

Tom Leonard (left) aged 4 with his brother and cousins

 

This is a largely humorous account of Tom Leonardís early life, and his academic career in Statistics at the Universities of London (1966-72), Warwick (1972-80), Wisconsin (1979-1996) and Edinburgh (1995-2001) that was influential in numerous application areas of his Bayesian-Fisherian approach to mathematical statistics. These include medicine, econometrics, psychometrics, educational testing, finance, business, geophysics, animal breeding, substance abuse, forensic science, and the law.

         Tom, for example, re-addresses the Lindley-Smith controversy and its effects on his career, together with George Boxís incisive impact on applied statistical methodology, and the military activities that led to the demise of the Math Research Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

         The history surrounding Tomís pivotal December 1989 speech in Madison, Wisconsin on gay discrimination in the military is documented and appended.  Koutskyís Hypothesis, which addresses the genesis of gay and lesbian people, is described in Chapter 6.

         Further drama rears its head on unexpected occasions during the narrative. We should always feel a touch of concern about potential ripples from above.

 
 
 
 
 
  © Thomas Hoskyns Leonard, 2012 - 2015